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-called fiscal cliff on friday here in washington. first, speaker boehner's morning news conference, followed by house minority leader's nancy pelosi i. then president obama friday afternoon from the white house. issue is not whether health care will be stigmatized or condemned. we know the answer to that. the issue is how many different times can the government to punish him as a result of that moral condemnation. the answer in the double jeopardy clause is one. >> starting monday and a threat christmas week, c-span.org radio is featuring supreme court arguments by current justices before they were on the bench. you can listen to c-span.org radio in the washington baltimore area at 90.1 fm. or online at c-span.org. >> if you worked for him, you would get a material, sometimes generous, sometimes over barry -- overbearing, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class, they are not going to apologize to their secretaries or typist. he had a way of turning the tables in his version of an apology, which would be to say, i am actually a very kind man, and you are
sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this impending gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down by 25%. everyone thinks the doc fix is not a good idea and we should fix it permanently. it is something that we face every year. host: if nothing happens next year, the cost is estimated to be $25 billion. over two years, $41 billion. guest: it is expensive and we always have to find a way to pay for it. we are looking for some other cuts that we can make to tota
delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own list for washington. you should keep your eye on who gets some this year. there are going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it has been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end. obviously, i cannot be more honored to be back in the white house. but i am already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. i love you back. [applause] one of the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it gives you a chance to talk to the american people about what kind of country we want to be and what kind of country we want to leave to our kids. i believe america only thrives when we have a strong middle class. i believe we are at our best when everybody gets a chance to get ahead. we were talking about these guys' dads. just passed away at the age of 101. these guys have good genes in addition to inventive minds. the stories about businesses, hiring folks, making sure you can get ahead, that
. [cheers and applause] >> and senator campbell, of course, drove that tree 5,500 miles to washington dis-- d.c. [cheers and applause] >> now this incredibly beautiful tree has been decorated with ornaments crafted by colorado residents which reflect the theme celebrating our great outdoors. and speaking of ornaments, the u.s. capitol historical society produces a beautiful one to place upon this tree. and at this time, i would like to welcome its president, mr. ronald serrison. [applause] >> thank you very much. and ladies and gentlemen, mr. speaker, it is our pleasure, the u.s. capitol historical society every year to produce an ornament placed on this tree. it is important because it is our 50th anniversary. the society was founded in 1962. it is a scene, a winter scene of the capitol dome with snow and so forth. very beautiful. you can purchase it at www.uschs.org. thank you very much for allowing us to be part of the program. >> thank you, ron. [applause] >> thank you so much, ron. and for more than 40 years, the u.s. forest service and architect of the capitol have partnered to brin
for washington to face, they do talk about the deficit and the debt in getting the fiscal house in order. that is not the full extent of the list. but behind different as we talk about priorities along partisan and racial lines. let's start with where we are and with the public has been pounded with this message week after we, on the question of resolving the immediate fiscal cliff. how would you describe your temperature, your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation and a deal even on the tax and spending and sequester side or both? >> good morning. glad to be with you and give you my perspective on where we are. to the beginning of your question, i often say one i am giving remarks that -- people in the same group, no matter how ponce and they are, people -- no matter how partis and they are, people will say two things. i want you to go to washington and stand on your principal. i want you to fight for us. i say, i will. someone else will get up and say, i want you to compromise and find the middle ground and get things done. this is the 10th time this just happen to me.
. >> there's another point where you talk about the civilians in washington seeing too many rambo movies. >> there was an element pressuring, i felt, for us to take action when we were not prepared to do that. and that, frankly, as early as november, i was called mccollum. >> general george mccollum. >> yeah, because they saw a civil war series where he sits outside and won't attack lee. so schwarzkopf was referred to him. >> who is they? >> i don't know. i mean it. everyone comes after me and says name names. you know why i don't know name? because colin powell had the good sense not to give it to me. people in the national security counsel i don't know if -- colin was relaying to me what was going on in washington. we were trading information back and forth. when this came up i got burned. this guy who watches the pbs series and he is operations -- schooled in the operational arts and is going to explain to schwarzkopf how to run war. this guy is so stupid. there is a big difference. he had outnumbered lee 10:1 and at the time we were outnumbered 3:1. i said to colin, i said who is the
airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of high speed passenger rail has tried and failed to solve the problems it was intended to solve. these plans were almost always preceded by funding cuts, system i can safety and reliability problems caused a great deal of upheaval in the transportation and forced countries to renational lies a system. with that being said, we think that amtrak's long-term next general plan for the northeast corridor provides a temp plate for a public private partnership that is worth discussing. if the partnership does not reduce the public interest or the interest of the brotherhood of lock motive engineers and other skilled workers. further they be
not exactly a bass chan of conservative open borders, "the washington post," and i particularly direct this comment to steve and suggest he tuth have some conversation with the post. on the seventh of july, it put out a major article and this was the headline. u.s. pushes for more scientists but the jobs aren't there. i'll give you a quote in a moment. i did take the opportunity since my agency has a few scientists to interview about this and i said what is your opinion. not all, but the consensus overall, why are we here, we're here because the jobs aren't in the private realm. a second source was organized labor that i recently went to in view of this forum and the public relations person said we agree with the "washington post." i'll leave you with one quote and i invite steve to approach the post. there have been many predictions of science labor shortages said the editor of the online magazine science careers and yet it seems awfulfully hard for people to find a job. anyone who goes into science expecting employers to clam more for their services will be deeply disappointed. >> we
. -- allyson schwartz. + commodore of bills, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> one of the things that did surprise me a little, i did not conduct a nationwide survey of gun owners, but among people with gun -- guns the guys start with is very different. owner realizes when he has a gun it is a huge responsibility. if you use the weapon irresponsible plea -- irresponsibly, you could cause yourself trouble off, death even to people that you did not intend to do harm to. it makes you very careful. or it should make you very careful. for most people it does. it would make people more careful if they all had to pass some kind of a test before they get a license. you did not always have to with a gun in many localities. >> craig whitney on the history of gun ownership and gun control in america. and from living with guns, a liberal pays for the second amendment. saturday night at 10:00 eastern. part of four days of non-fiction books and authors through christmas days. as the electoral college met monday, we spoke with a social studies teacher at pioneer
to extend tax cuts for most americans. his remarks came as congress leaves washington without a plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. the president said he hoped any deal to avoid the fiscal cliff would also include and extension of unemployment insurance and lay this is about 7 minutes. >> good afternoon, everybody. for the last few weeks, i have been working with the leaders of both parties on a proposal to get our deficit under control, to avoid tax cuts -- to avoid tax hikes on the middle-class. and to make sure we can spur jobs and economic growth. a balanced proposal that cuts spending, but also ask the wealthiest americans to pay more, a proposal that will strengthen the middle class over the long haul, and our economy over the long haul. in the course of these negotiations, i offered to compromise with republicans in congress. i met them halfway on taxes and more than halfway on spending. today, i am still willing to get a comprehensive package done. i still believe that reducing our deficit is the right thing to do for the long-term health of our economy and the confidence of our
, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal," live saturday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. tonight, and look at the white house and congress and how they are addressing the so-called fiscal cliff. first, president obama speaks in pennsylvania, followed by john boehner responded to the president from capitol hill. then eric cantor response of the lighthouse deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end of the bush tax cuts on those earning more than two and a $50,000. ed -- more than $250,000. ["hail to the chief" plays] please have a seat. have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello. it is good to be back in pennsylvania. it is good to be right here. i want to thank michael, robert, and the investor, joel glickman for hosting me today and giving me a great tour. stand up so everybody can see you, guys. [cheers and applause] there you go. we have a couple of outstanding members of congress here. [cheers and app
night there was a cia -- there is a documentary about two cia agents killed in washington by middle easterner. the wife said that is dirty money. the fine me raised it to $2 million. they found him and brought him back. he is executed in 2004. how about the united nations doing this? putting a bounty on people. >> there are legal issues. we decided to treat this individual as a criminal. when you are overseas, that maybe what you have to do in order to get these people and bring to justice. i would never have that in u.s. hands -- i would rather have that in u.s. hands. >> i think george washington summed it up best. keep strong american borders and stay out of other countries squabbles. what ever happened to our christian ethics and foundation? >> the biggest change in american foreign-policy since the republic was founded was the creation of nato in 1947. it was the point in time the united states said they would engage in other countries in our national interest. the previous 165 years of american history avoided those kinds of commitments. you can make your own decisions if it w
is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal slope, not a fiscal cliff. it is not like a zombie accomplice happens. if market confidence was up the window, that could be damaging. >> i think is likely there is going to be a deal, some other deadline for another deal next year. it is really important and they not said a whole series of opportunities to have that kind of collapse again. they have a couple months, but they have to make sure whenever they come up with f
and the political class here in washington d.c. so consumed by fear and hatred of the n.r.a. and american gun owners that you're willing to accept a world where real resistence to evil monssters is alone, unarmed, school principal left to vender her life, her life to shield those children in her care? no one, no one regardless of personal, political prejudice has the right to impose that sacrifice. ladies and gentlemen, there's no national one side fits all solution to protecting our children. but do know this president see road out school emergency planning grants in last year's budget and scrapped secure our schools policing grants in next year's budget. with all the foreign aid the united states does, with all the money in the federal budget, can't we afford to put a police officer in every single school? even if they did that, politicians have no business and no authority denying us the right, the ability and the moral imperative to protect ourselves and our loved ones from harm. now the national rifle association knows there are millions of qualified active and retired police. active reserve an
deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we're ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week. can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of count offer and we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit? >> the phone call was pleasant but was more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday were more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to was a count offer. >> the jobs record indicated unemployment is down roughly a full point from this time last year. if no deal happens -- [inaudible] . why take such a risk when the job numbers are improving. >> because increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produc
with him, we will see a new political atmosphere in washington. at this point it seems like more of the same. host: from facebook -- guest: one thing i a lot about yesterday was this is really raising the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the ame
? is there a singular documentary film, television show, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> my reaction was "saturday night live." i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. thank you very much. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work f
a hand. [applause] since he came to washington with president obama in 2009, he has been a forward thinking and caring supporter of the district. to the teachers and principals of this city in this country. he has helped secure millions of dollars in funding. they helped shape innovative policies, all across the country. he is a true leader, not just in time for celebration, but in times of tragedy and sorrow. yesterday, he attended the funeral of the principle of sandy hook elementary school that lost her life protecting the children of the school. ladies and gentlemen, i am proud, thankful, and privileged to introduce arne duncan. [applause] >> i want to thank the children for their fantastic support. please give a round of applause for the work she is doing. [applause] i think she is an amazing leader, and d.c. has come a long way and has a long way to go. with her passion in her heart, she is leading the charge. this is a bittersweet day. i think it is so important on days like this and every day, that we listen to our children. savor their innocence and applaud their unquencha
those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington post case for archives and congress and everywhere else -- posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone. i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as we have. >> today the 18 members of ohio 's electro college pass their votes for president barack obama -- now ohio possible electoral college -- of ohio's elecroral college passed their votes for president barack obama. courtesy of the ohio channel, this is 40 minutes. >> this is the 53rd meeting of the ohio electoral college. i would like to thank you for coming and welcome you to these procedures. i would like all who are gathered here today to stand for a moment of silent prayer or reflection for the victims, their families and our country as we mourn the deaths of the children and school officials in newtown, connecticut. >> thank you. to lead us through the taiex thank you. to lead us through the preliminary matters and to provide us with a welcoming address, i would like to pass the gavel to congresswoman elect, joyc
cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka pata, and allison schwartz. i just finished getting a tour of the connects workshop. i have to say,
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
are seeing businesses and consumers hold back because of the dysfunction they see in washington. economists, business leaders think we are poised to grow in 2013 as long as politics in washington do not get in the way of america's progress. we've got to get this done. i want to repeat -- we had a constructive meeting today. senators reid and mcconnell are discussing a potential agreement or we can get a bipartisan bill out of the senate over to the house and done in a timely fashion so we met the december 31 deadline. given how things have been working in this town, we always have to wait and see until it actually happens. the one thing the american people should not have to wait and see is some sort of action, so if we do not see an agreement between the two leaders in the senate, i expect a bill to go on the floor -- i have asked senator reid to do this -- put a bill on the floor of that make sure taxes on the middle class does not go up, that unemployment insurance is available for 2 million people, and it lays the groundwork for additional deficit reduction and economic growth steps tha
in washington on dealing with our economy and national debt and the eerie silence in congress as the list of horrific dwb gun crimes grows by the day. i'm encouraged by seralf my colleagues who have spoken out today. drad ition traddation -- traditionally they've been the side of those who opposed any limitation on firearms but they believe after newtown, connecticut, we have to reopen that conversation in a good faith effort to find common ground. too many colleagues shrug their shoulders when vot come to the floor for a vote. they feel duty bound to vote right on every scorecard issue. my wife and i grew up in downstate illinois with families of hunters. we know the rite of passage when a father takes his son or daughter out hunting the first time. i know fun of watching the sun come up on a duck blind and aring a seasoned hunter calling them over the water. the hunters i know are good people. they le their sport and they hate those who misuse firearms to tryst and -- terrorize and kill. we need these hunters to join with americans who never owned or used a gun to establish a reasonable
. host: sarah kliff covers health care for "the washington post." thank you for joining us. we take a look at america by the numbers and what america looks like by the year 2016. jennifer ortman and william frey here to talk about america by the numbers. we are back in a moment. >> president obama in the reaction to the connecticut shootings. later, the impacts of the so- called fiscal cliff on tax filings. >> president obama on the school shooting in connecticut. he said the time is not to take meaningful action. he was notified by homeland security advisor john brennan. he ordered flags lowered to half staff. this is about 5 minutes. >> i spoke with governor malloy and fbi director muller. i offered governor malloy my condolences on behalf of the nation and made it clear he will have every resource he needs to investigate this crime, care for theirctimw and families. we have endured too many of these tragedies. each time i learned the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. that was true today. there is not a parent in america who does not feel the
the fiscal deadline could affect the defense budget. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the so- called fiscal clef and what happens if the budget cuts take place in january. jim doyle the effect on businesses. after that, charles clark looks at domestic program cuts. in more about the issue with the brookings institution. bless your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets. that is live tuesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, president obama talking about the economy and the need to reach an agreement with congress on the january fiscal deadline. he spoke at a diesel plant outside of detroit. his remarks are about 25 minutes. >> hello, redford! [applause] it is good to be back in michigan. [applause] how is everybody doing today? [applause] now, let me just start off by saying we have something in common -- both our teams lost yesterday. [laughter] i mean, i would like to come here and talk a little smack about the bears, but we didn't quite get it done. but it is wonderful to be back. it is good to see everybody in the great state of michigan. [appl
, washington. people want to talk about these ideas. there is a huge appetite for what is war? how do we understand this? i felt this was an example vacation for me as to what the humanities can be and do. i embrace what you say. i worry about the decline in humanity concentrators even in institutions like ours. there are some places where the humanities are expendable when we have to constrained resources. i think we do ourselves a terrible disservice as a country. it does not focus on how to get where it needs to go but knows where it ought to be going. that is a fundamental obligation. >> a great ending to a great panel. thank you. [applause] i'm now going to invite al hunt to come up and introduces panel. in the last session i said gene sperling would be joining us after this discussion. he was in the midst of the fiscal cliff negotiations, so hopefully he will tell us how he is protecting these important investments. >> next, a conversation about spurring investment in the marketplace. this is hosted by the center for american progress. this is 55 minutes. >> that is a really tough
just because i am in washington, d.c. i don't believe that. of course states can and should do it because some states may have a different attitude towards this in pennsylvania than texas. so you want to take into account many of these issues that are environmental issues and reassuring people locally about whether the procedures being used are safe and reliable. often local people can do a better job of explaining that or they may not want as much of it. they may want less. i thinks states have a right to be wrong in terms of competence. i just went through a hearing the other day on this meningitis outbreak that we had where people were taking these bad injections with unsterile stuff produced by a massachusetts compound and factory and it was the tennessee department of health that found out and they saved lives. the fda was not looking too good. but yes is the answer to the question. the epa and the federal government have delegated a lot of the responsibilities for clean air and water to the states. they can have an overview for that, but i like the idea of states doing it
from places in washington and elsewhere that because of your swing state status, they don't like your rules and they participate. voting is really the culture of a state for if you want to have confidence in it, it has to come from both sides and with it and and people have to believe in the process and it is different in all of our state. s. therefore a lot of outrageous claims that appeared during the legislative process and our elections process in ohio but if you're talking about the balance, what are the two big charges? suppression and fraud are the two charges of you here. charges of voter suppression in ohio, i will give you a few of them. it is said that we were preventing -- our rules prevented people from having easy access to those. here are the rules -- for the first time, every single voter in our state received an absentee ballot request mailed to their room that was nearly 7 million voters. every voter had nearly 35 days to vote without ever leaving their house. or wherever they might have lived. over that 35 days, the dissenters were open weekdays from 8-5 for the fir
negotiations in washington. we will show you remarks from president obama at the white house and senate majority leader harry reid and mitch mcconnell on the senate floor. first, an update on where negotiations stand after the meeting between president and congressional leaders at the white house. >> steven dennis joins us from the role call as a white house reporter. stephen, how did the meeting between the president and congressional leaders go? >> i think it was a meeting where they may be set the framework for getting a short- term deal to avert tax increases for most americans, extend unemployment benefits, and maybe take care of a few other small things. at this point, it is a race against the clock and it is up to harry reid and mitch mcconnell and the senate to see if they can have a bipartisan compromise. the president said if he cannot come up with something in the next couple days, he wants harry reid to bring a bill to the floor that would do with the president wants to do, which is tax increases, extend unemployment benefits, etcetera, at least get a vote on it. harry reid
in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both of our resources and of our innovative skills to help the country through these times and put us in a good footing for the next 50, 100 years. and secondly, i think this report really is the beginning of a process of creating an effective deep and stable bipartisan consensus on energy policy, in a town where everything is about the zero sum game. we are trying to escape that zero sum game. and we see the oil security as a unifyin
can to say this as the happen again. >> we will be joined in washington to discuss meetings. >> the members of congress were told -- the committee also heard from advocacy groups in this hearing. >> the committee on oversight and government reform will come to order. this hearing on 1 in 88 children looks into the federal response of rising rates will come to order. americans have the right to know the money washingotn takes from them is well-spent. americans deserve an effective and efficient government that works for them. our duty is to protect these rights. our solemn obligation is to hold government accountable to taxpayers because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. we worked tirelessly with citizen watchdogs to bring genuine reform to federal bureaucracy. this is our mission and i might say today, in many cases, we're dealing with people because of this affliction who may never pay taxes but in fact their families and others paid for an entire life. congress spends a lot of time discussing and debating issues and determining by our phil
, your calls and comments on "washington journal." than a discussion on the future of syria. a forum of the impact of the latino population in future elections. >> i wanted to explain how this totalitarianism happens. we do know the story of the cold war. we know the documents. we have seen the archives that describe relationships between stalin, church hill, and truman. we know the events from our point of view. i wanted to show from a different angle from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people who work subjected to this system. how did people make choices and how did they react in the cave? one of the things that has happened since 1999 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become differentiated. these countries no longer have much of in common with each other. >> from the end of world war ii through 1956. from "iron curtain" on c-span a &a. >> how states are bracing for sequestration. the schedule for january affecting many agencies and
this week? >> we're going to break away from this portion of this morning's "washington 12 suspension bills today. the real action taking place off the florida senate back in at 11:00 where we are monitoring the fiscal cliff negotiations and will bring you information as warranted. by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. loving god, we give you thanks for giving us near day. on this last day of 2012, forget not your people. there are many differences plaguing our nation's discourse . please send wisdom upon the leaders serving in government and good will on all principles on current negotiations. we thank you for the service of so many who work in this building whose labor provides the lubrication for the very public actions of the members of this assembly. though each deserves special mention, bless especially this day, jay pierson, who works his last day of 34 years of faithful service on the floor of the house. may all that is done this day be for your greater honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proce
for your time today. that is all for "washington journal" today. thank you for turning in. later on, the house will be in at 12:00 p.m. for morning hours and then [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> here's a look at what is happening today. oming up, a look at egypt's constitutional referendum. we'll have a live on c-span to at 10:30 eastern -- on c-span2. we will focus on two stay today. we're in columbus, ohio and later we'll of taped coverage of the meeting in north carolina. beckett's underway at noon eastern on c-span3. rely that 12:15 with a discussion on raising the medicare eligibility age. you can watch it on c-span2. >> we want to beat on every device or every person at every hour of the day. we're a mobile society. the challenge is to make sure we're on pads, computers, phones, as well as in the traditional living room on the high-definition television screen. the other challenge is that spectrum is a finite resource and others want that resource. there's not enough spectrum to do all video by
. this is a wonderful opportunity. this is where the printing press for the washington post was done. kinds of things are very familiar if they were away working, they were independent, and we were mindful of work and what that meant. whether it was scrubbing the floor is or working in the executive suites to always provide respect and dignity to everyone. talk about women having their voices heard, i always felt very supported by my mother and father. my father was often challenged me in a way that is not often spoken about. he would say give it your best, whatever you do. keep in mind not everyone may understand or know he may have to offer but respect yourself always and respect others. >> how important is that whether it as teachers or guidance counselors? >> i know i would not be doing what i'm doing or working room working had not been for someone early in my life who challenged me and said you are going to be leaving my school. what are your plans? this was a career counselor in high school and asked me are you going to prepare itself for college? i don't have the means to go there. my parents
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